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can you tell us when conservatives get more honest about the debt and deficit. a conservative columnist says about the new ryan budget, it sacrificed seriousness for seriousness by promising to reach budgetary balance, not over the long term as budgets 1.0 and 2.0 did, but in a ten year window. this is not going to happen, and more importantly there's no reason why it needs to happen. modest deficits are perfectly compatible with fiscal responsibility. talk about singing a new tune. and the conservative think tank, the american enterprise institute asks why does the budget need to balance in ten years? debt reduction doesn't require balance, just that the economy is growing faster than the debt, while the plan does put the debt to gdp ratio on a downward trajectory, it probably doesn't need to be quite as steep. ezra klein, this is a big deal, and you're here on this show to prove it is a big deal. you would never come out this late if this wasn't a huge deal. >> absolutely not. >> this is huge. the debt is the reason we have to do all these terrible things to medicare, which
decade. and $100 billion in stimulus spending. and would do little to cut spending or the deficit. four democrats mark pryor of arkansas, kay haigen of north carolina, mark baggich of alaska and max bachus of montana all up for reelection in november joined senate republicans who voted against it. even though the margin was close senate leaders were praising colleagues for a job well done. >> i know everyone is exhausted. and you may not feel it at the moment but this is one of the senate's finest days in recent years and i commend everyone who has participated in this extraordinary debate. >> first of all, over the last two decades the average budget resolution considered 78 amendments. we have done 101. average vote 37 amendments we have done twice as many. doing this has been herculean feat. >> harris: next the senate must reconcile the budget with a plan passed by republicans. now, context showing how differently the plans would deal with the economy. the senate plan calls for $46.5 trillion in spending, nearly $5 trillion more than the house plan and more revenue an additional $1 b
introduce $20 billion in additional taxes this year and $40 billion in new taxes next year. so the deficit under the democratic senate budget proposal which only thing we've got at this point, calls for more spending and more taxes and bigger deficits. that is not where the american people are. recent polls this week showed that 55% of the american people favored the republican budget plan. if you took the word republican off of it and simply described would you support a budget that balances the budget and raises no taxes and cuts $5 trillion of them favor that 55% to 24% that budget that would raise taxes by a trillion and cut spending by hundred billion and not balance the budget which is what the democratic budget calls for. >> greta: we are 18 months out from the 2014 election. we have the house has passed a budget and senate has passed a budget. it will go to a conference for reconciliation. both parties have made it sent tral focus of 2014. it is a signal they are more interested in winning and making sorted smear each other's face with each other budget rather than drawing common g
account deficits, we're not shipping as much joe seas? >> when people think of the economic situations, they think of the u.s. but what it will do, it will cut into the u.s. deficit and it will cut into the chinese surplus. and you ask the average economist for the last three or four years before the crisis, during the crisis, after the crisis, what's the global economic problem, number one, the answer probably isn't microimbalances. trade surplus in the u.s., trade surplus and china. what i didn't know is that still more than half of the u.s. deficit of goods and services is energy imports. >> and that's going to go away? >> as things are going, that might be going away. at the same time, china surplus will suffer from the tracing of independence of china. >> that's strong dollar weak yuan. becky. >> just an observation. >> first, tight oil, i haven't heard of this before. i know where the marcellus shale fields are. where is tight oil? is it in the same sort of locations? >> same. traditionally, coming out of gas yields because of this huge different between gas and oil prices. which
, this is all washington talks abou about, which is deficits and budgets. and you could argue that, in terms of the goalposts, we're arguing in and around the rand paul budget or paul ryan budget. and there was very little news of the house caucus budget. which should be the flag around which democrats rally, given the stream opposition. >> the progressive caucus budget is the most responsible budget that's been presented. i think even more than patty murray's budget. the senate democratic budget. but you're right. it doesn't get attention, because inside the beltway, the fixation is on deficit reduction, and that's by conservatives who somehow buy the idea that government is going to crush us if we don't drastically cut now. i don't think they want to kus as much as rand paul wants to cut. and you were right to highlight that part of his budget, increasing the retirement age and privatizing medicare, because i think that's the part of his budget that's going to really crash his 2016 hopes. but to get back to 2014, you know, it's going to be up to obama, particularly, to lead the charge. he'
? and also the idea that the federal government can't have a deficit, it's crazy. the republicans have somehow adopted this and sold the american people that the most important thing facing this congress and country is to balance the federal budget. no, it's not. how about creating jobs? how about repairing our infrastructure? repairing our bridges and our highways and sewage treatment plans and all of that? how about investing in new energy projects and new medical advances and a cure for cancer? that's a hell of a lot more important than balancing the freakin' budget. that's the first thing wrong with this ryan budget. the second thing is that the ryan budget destroys medicare. still does. we talked about it this is the same damn budget that they passed two years ago, that they passed last year. it would shut down medicare for anybody who is not already in it, cut benefits for those who are, but shut down medicare for anybody who is not in it and replace it with a voucher. a voucher that would not even come close to buying you health care from a private insuran
, you've heard about the fracking but further into that, i think that the trade deficit for the u.s., two to three years from now is going to go from deficit to surplus. we haven't had a surplus since 1975. secondly, global trade, global trade is actually very good for the u.s. because it grows the global economy. for instance, there's a new panama canal that is going to really bowler is it the south belt trade from china to other emerging markets. technology is always, we're looking in the technology, there is something called big beta. this is taking technology from cost controls to revenue enhancement. we coined our own pivot. per re, indsmeesh that, vietnam, oman and turkey. tracy: what worries you the most right now? >> europe. i'm very concerned that cyprus is not by itself a big deal but they keep changing the rules of the game and the financial system is very precarious right now in europe. the u.s. is fine. and i'm just wondering how long can europe, we're in the third, they're in the third recession in five years, how long can they not grow? all the debt forgiveness in t
on the economy and creating jobs and building stable middle class than they are on cutting the deficit. yeah, the deficit is an issue. it's not the number one issue. >> why, boehner do that? we don't have an immediate debt crisis. you would see that in the market, right? so baner er isboehner is sayin. it is against what he's been saying which is the debt is a problem. why did he do that? >> he said we need to address it over the long term. that means taking steps now. but here's the thing, he is actually opening the possibility that republicans move to more favorable ground because right now the problem is that republicans are emphasizing have been emphasizing root canal economics, only fiscal austerity rather than a more positive agenda. by conceding the point that we don't have an immediate debt crisis, then can you raise some questions. so for example, senator patty murray said let's get rid of the loopholes and deductions. now republicans say, sure, let's do that. instead of sending money to washington, let's make the child tax credit bigger. let's offer middle class tax relief. let's
to cut the democrbudg deficits and cut defense spending and simplify the tax code and lower tax rates. in a deal with president obama they could get the first four, more deficit reduction, protect defense, the democratic president would get some cover in cutting medicare and social security and they could simplify the tax code by taking out expenditures. they are now saying they want none of those things and also not going to get the tax rates and keep the sequester and not have a deal. i've asked a lot of them to walk me through the reasoning here and honestly never come to an answer i understand a little bit. >> does that mean they're post policy. even some things that seem like constants don't actually a matter them, it's pure politics, just positioning themselves v a vis-a-vis the president and not interested in a particular outcome for the country? >> i would like to have an answer where that isn't true. i really would. i've been trying to find it. i'm sure part is i'm not smart enough to do so or found the right people to have spoken to them. it's hard to come up with one. we c
the president a major deficit reduction victory or not? if they really believe that needs to be done and the president put something on the table that gets them significant entitlement reform and savings, i think they've got to do it. >> harold, i think the possibility of deals and immigration, possibility of deals on guns, possibility of deals on the budget, on the long-term debt, i think the possibilities are actually -- excuse me for being optimistic, pretty darn good on all fronts. you've got republicans who daily are holding press conferences wringing their hands trying to figure out how to save their party. and you have a president who, again, he's a 47%, pretty damn good considering everything. but still, he wants to be over 50% and he wants a legacy. he doesn't want to just talk about what he did the first two years. >> i agree. i believe the prospects for progress on both immigration and gun control are gun regulation. if we get progress on the budget and the debt. i think immigration and gun regulations are easier to win. if the economy hobbles along and don't get me wrong,
and iraq were fought as quote emergencies, which means they weren't included in the annual deficits. so, now, when they're talking about a budget that cuts student loan programs for gi members, people coming back from iraq and afghanistan now they're not getting their student loans. because this was all fought off budget. i think that's political malpractice on the part of the republican party. they should have budgeted for this. >> well, from a congressional physician of the soul like diana degette, thank you so much. now to dr. james peterson, msnbc analyst and director of africana st studies. professor, millions oppose the war, but as you know, and i'm sure you remember, their voices were significantly marginalized. give us a sense of how that happened. >> there's a lot of context here. we have to start with the fact that the sort of american ethos in response to 9/11 was a sort of patriotism, people not in line with the government and a very war hawkish administration seemed to be anti-american. so in that environment, the voices that were speaking out against this war, but in that
be in a deficit in 10 years the argument however is that the senate budget creates jobs and economic growth from the middle out. now, that's according to the author. senator pattie murray. for the democrats the vote is a really big accomplishment. >> first of all, over the last two decades the average budget resolution considered 78 amendments. we have done 101. the average vote arama 70 amendments. twice as many. doing this has been a her could herculessen feet. senator murray and senator sessions. >> during the vote senators were facing more than 500 amendments which were filed but 70 were voted on. of course when you do take a 13 hour six minute vote there has to be a little bit of humor. >> it is good to say that as -- as of this time, 5:00 a.m., there has not been a day without a budget being passed in the united states senate. >> and some interesting observations from the vote. all democrats voted yeah with the exception of for up for re-election 2014. unfriendly to democrats. mark beg gich from alaska. baucus from montana. pryor from arc. hagan from north carolina. recently passed the rya
, italy because they're all suffering and because of too much spending, too much debt, deficit is too high. all right, senator, congratulations on your big win. i know when you announce if you're running for president you'll do it hear? you want to make that promise? >> oh, yeah, we didn't already announce it. >> sean: no, i'm just checking. thank you, senator. >> all right. >> sean: appreciate it. and coming up on "hannity." >> i studied the constitution myself. i'm roonebly well-educated and i thank you for the lecture. >> i would note that she chose not to answer the question that i asked. >> the answer is obvious no. >> sean: well, she did need the lecture, left wing senator dianne feinstein says she felt, quote, patronized by that exchange simply because she was asked about the assault weapons ban. and ted cruz will join me to respond and later dr. benjamin carson brought down the house over at cpac and hinting that he may run for the white house. i'll ask him about that and much more. this is a jam-packed edition of "hannity." much more straight ahead. ♪ [ slap! ] [ male announcer
out of our deficits, we could save social security, medicare and have an economic growth boom that we haven't seen in a long time. >> california alone in one shale oil field has 100 billion barrels of oil. that is california. >> sean: how stupid, we are a stupid country. we're stupid because we allow the government-- why are you looking at me. >> i'm agreeing with you. >> sean: we're a stupid country. >> we need to get out of our own way, but this is a little bit after small detail, but a very important one for business and for america to understand. last week, one of the rules of the obama administration put out was to say that if you're going forward with any sort of project you're going to have to tell us how much carbon that will put out into the-- so it's called the nipa analysis and that's like putting a ten pound weight on everybody's ankle. >> sean: that's a hundred pound weight. >> it sounds like a minor bureaucratic detail, but it will strangle-- >> you guys will weigh in and i hope you'll pick a fight with you here. i've got to tell you, dana, they're not doing this, not ta
unemployed, 42 out of 50 states are facing a budget deficit. and to be honest there is very little leadership coming out of washington. so i think what i tried to do is raise these issues with civility, whether you're republican or democrat, we're all americans. and i think we deserve more. we deserve better. and washington really needs to help us create the kind of leadership and decision making by putting their feet in the shoes of every day americans. that's not what's going on. >> you recently were speaking at the national retail federation and you said that the lack of leadership in washington, i just want to quote you, because i thought it was beautifully said, is sapping the life blood, the soul and the confidence of our country as the world witnessed a lack of leadership in the united states. is that message ever going to get through? are we reaching a point where you say i grew up poor, i became wealthy, i was able to start a company and it's not going to be able to happen to people in the next generation? >> i think you're bringing up a very important question. let's frame it as the
as the chicago public school system faces a reported billion dollar deficit. alderman willie cochran's ward, constituents have been calling all day. >> some cases we are happy, in some cases we are not so happy. >> reporter: on the plus side, the district says the savings will allow major investments in surviving schools including adding 70 libraries, science labs, even air conditioning. for many it's not what's gained but what's lost and where. neighborhood schools in some of chicago's poorest communities. the decisions were based on low enrollment but others say race made a role. an outraged carrie austin, an alderman, told "the chicago tribune," quote, every time the whites go to screaming and hollering, they back off and steam roll over black and brown folks. not this time. and she's not the only one who believes that. you think it's the black communities that often are asked to sacrifice first? >> in this case, yes, i do. yes, i do. >> reporter: this is 70th street in the heart of the city's south side and this is the local elementary school. parents are proud of it. the sign up there
exaggerated by looking at year to date, a boon. the boon right now, at a 56 basis point deficit to the treasuries. that's a wide spread. and the last two-day chart of the euro versus the dollar. should it break through 1.28.80, it could challenge the current four-month lows versus the greenback. sue, back to you. >> rick, thank you very much. >>> some new clues about the state of the job market today. the number of americans filing unemployment benefits rising slightly last week to 336,000. a tad below estimates. we've seen a number of job cuts announced recently. so is the labor market running out of steam? listen to what "mad money's" jim cramer said earlier today. >> tens of thousands of people are going to be laid off within the next month. >> whatever little. >> and that's going to show up in the numbers, in that 330,000 employment, that may be the last good one. bernanke is not smoking dope, pot, whatever they call it now. >> well, is he right? joining us now is "the wall street journal's" chief economics correspondent john hillsenrath. good to see you. >> good to be here.
calling about the obamacare and also about the deficit in the united states. my feeling is, many workers across america have lost their insurance and have lower wages because of company downsizing and lower profits. we still pay government workers high wages and give them excellent paid insurance. maybe it is time to decrease their wages and to make their -- make them have a payment they have to pay for their insurance -- [indiscernible] guest: interesting point you bring up about people losing their health insurance. in a bipartisan move in this budget, there is a directive to couch the effect of the number of people losing their health insurance because of obamacare. it was a republican sponsored saying -- thing. they will try to see how much it is occurring. host: the house approved the continuing resolution by 310- 109. 27 republicans and 82 republicans voted no. theye senate version, passed -- 20 republicans voted yes. the democrat of montana voted no. now that these two measures have been passed by the separate chambers, what happens next? guest: the cr goes to the president. sign
're going to see the debt and deficit dwindle massively. let's talk about the contest in which dr. carson were speaking, if were talking about the debt and the policy prescriptions of the democrats and the obama administration then he needs to present a counter argument. he needs to present a vision for america that goes against that and he's fnot doing that, he's condemning and criticizing the president's motives, and by insinuation. >> that's absolutely not true. and in fact-- >> disrespectful for the office. >> first of all, he's not run for office. he's not doing this to seek political power, he loves this country. and number one. number two, you mentioned the debt, megyn, this president by the time he leaves office and reelected and we can all agree it that would have added more to the debt than all of his predecessors, including the much maligned george w. bush combined. he had no pro growth, and doesn't protect the balance and the president is delinquent by two months presenting a budget. en you're making your assessment at 5% growth and we have government spending at 25% of gdp. t
-term debt and recovered the budget deficit. detroit is the largest u.s. city ever put under state control. those are your headlines. i am lauren reed. back to connell. connell: a move lower in stocks. we have noticed some of the french banks. they are all down. dagen: a snowstorm that dumped as much as 2 feet in the northwest. connell: i would rather be over in cyprus. >> good morning. we are tracking it again. parts of illinois being hit with as much as 15 inches of snow. it is as far west as parts of indiana. the highest snowfall totals should be a foot of snow. we do have winter storm warnings in effect. it is because of the wind and snowfall amounts. we actually have been seeing some delays. they are about an hour or so. you could see four-6 inches of snow out here. the central appellations and most of these warnings should expire by tomorrow. that is what we think the storm system will pull out of the northeast leaving behind some quieter conditions. connell: that sounds, well, all right. dagen: tom kloza is coming up with a big addiction on gasoline prices. he says you will save mon
. cyprus needed a total bail out of 17 billion euros and they needed to to fund their banks and deficit. they said we will only give you ten and you have to come up with the other seven. it led to runs on atms in cyprus and protests as the president arrived at parliament. here's what they decided to do. they're going to tax bank depos sxits the ox original plan on saturday, 10% if you have an account larger than 100,000 euros and here's what led to the protests, 6.75% if you're under 100,000 euros and that's fdic deposit insurance. market watchers were aghast that insured depositors would be hit, but the insurance was essentially a falsehood. what if citizens in italy or spain begin to think that they being lose their money even if it is supposedly insured? could that lead to bank runs? it is so controversial the cyprus parliament couldn't get it passed yesterday. they say they would do it today. it didn't happen and now they're trying for tomorrow. they are re-working the plan so the smaller guy is not hit so hard, but still, it appears they're going after insured deposits. why did the
that the information exists, but the lack of a communication ability to translate that is a significant deficit. for highly uncommon event such as an asteroid flyby, there simply no established mutation mechanism that i believe our flight operations team learned of da 14 when they received a courtesy call from a colleague at the aerospace corporation. last year the commercials of the industry participate in deities shriek for war games. these games are held every other year and they're designed to exercise dvd thinking about the deployment of the terrestrial and space aspects in response to a complex situation. last of those games included as they have several times in the past that dod relies on commercial satellite company, their reliance is considerable and that a crisis is the wrong time to establish clear lines accumulation which a major partners and suppliers. i suspect the same conclusion can be safely applied to the topics we're discussing today. while governments were first to since i want to near earth space, commercial enterprise will be the primary user of the orbital arc in the 21s
. they will take middle-class money. they will take everybody's money in order to pay off the deficit. it's something you have to think about. >> brian: there was a report from somebody in great britain, an authority of some sort who was talking about, given what has happened in sigh plus, if i had money in spain i would get it out. >> no, it's being talked about in other places. in worse of terms of condition, spain is a good one, greece and lots of other places and they are talking about it. you know, at some point maybe they start talking here. what ultimately that means is that jobs will -- you think we have bad unemployment now. you will see unemployment like you've never seen it before. >> gretchen: somebody from your show, celebrity apprentice, a lot of people will be shocked they didn't see it. amarosa and claudia got the hook >> why didn't she bring amarosa back? in all fairness claudia, i have to defend you. if she was brought back it wouldn't matter. you were the project manager and you failed. you have a great future. i'm sorry -- you're fired! >> did you for a second i can't
for this in more ways than one. you think about the deficit, the government doesn't have this kind of cash and people are concerned this isn't necessarily the best use of taxpayer money. in the video, you saw a second ago, people are dressed up as crew members on a starship enterprise, and the government employee version of characters claiming they will boldly go where no government employees have ever gone before. it is funny. but i watched the videos with my producer and we were trying to to figure out the training value and people have similar questions. >> i have been since corrected and am about to burst into a fit of giggles and i inappropriately said it is "gilligan's island," not whatever i said. what is the irs saying about this in. >> they came up with this statement saying it is -- i'm quoting now, no mistaking this video does not reflect the best stewardship of resources, and that video of this type will not be made today. so the irs does say training gener videos in general are cheaper. that would involve some travel. >> okay. zain asher, thank you. >>> honeymoons, they are th
. that's how many chicago schools will be closed because a $1 billion budget deficit. it's not clear how many teachers are lose their jobs, but they will close a bunch of schools. 43,000. that's how many jobs have been lost since j.c. penney -- at j.c. penney since ron johnson became ceo. a new report shows he let the company pay for at least nine executives to get work by two jets, which cost $41 million apiece. nice work if you can get it. mr. kilmeade? >> brian: or if you had it. it's one of the most outrageous stories of the week. one of the most popular pharmacies telling their employees to step on the scale or pay a penalty. cvs wants employees to report their weight, fat and glucose levels to health insurance bosses and if they don't, they get fined $600 a year. it might be legal, but is it fair? steven mitchell is an employment attorney and author of a book, "the employee rights handbook." and john is a professor at a law school. does this sound right to you? >> it's an outrage n my opinion. they're trying to help people's health, but when you impose a penalty on people, that's w
of a communication ability to translate that is a significant deficit. for highly uncommon events such as an asteroid fly-by, there's simply no established communication mechanism. i believe our flight operations team learned of da-14 when they received a courtesy call from a colleague at the aerospace corporation. last year the commercial satellite industry participated in dod's war games designed to exercise dod thinking about the deployment of its terrestrial and space assets in response to a conflict situation. last year those games concluded, as they have several times in the past, that dod relies on commercial satellite companies -- their reliance is considerable and that a crisis is the wrong time to try to establish clear lines of communication with your major partners and suppliers. i suspect the same conclusion can be safely applied to the topics that we're discussing today. while governments were first to send satellites to near-earth space, commercial enterprise will be the primary use of the orbital arc in the 21st century. government and space operators need to take a more collaborative
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)

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